Central Coast Farm Labor Organizing Collection

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 Cesar Chavez and supporters at a pro-Proposition 14 community meeting in Santa                Maria - restricted
Cesar Chavez and supporters at a pro-Proposition 14 community meeting in Santa Maria - restricted
Cesar Chavez, center right, and an unknown UFW female sympathizer, far right, attend one of several meetings held in Santa Maria cultivating support for Proposition 14. Chavez had community support from Pete Cohen, and Raul Ceja, two of the UFWs local strategists., 098-045
 Cesar Chavez speaking (with bodyguards at his side) - restricted
Cesar Chavez speaking (with bodyguards at his side) - restricted
Cesar Chavez, bodyguards at his side, tells workers how they can organize themselves to receive better wages, working conditions, and, most importantly, earn self-respect. Chavez had invited Santa Marias UFW chapter to Coachella to help organize grape strikes and picket Teamster interference., 098-035
 Mexicali workers and Santa Maria UFW supporters en route to a UFW strike near                Yuma, Arizona, 1972 - restricted
Mexicali workers and Santa Maria UFW supporters en route to a UFW strike near Yuma, Arizona, 1972 - restricted
A contingent of Mexican workers from Mexicali and UFW supporters from Santa Maria take a break while en route to a UFW strike near Yuma, Arizona sometime in 1972. Committee members in the photo also worked in Arizona as farm laborers. The bus in background was one of a fleet UFW used to shuttle supporters to the front lines., 098-012
Cesar Chavez debating with a grower - restricted
Cesar Chavez debating with a grower - restricted
It was a busy year. Members of Santa Marias UFW chapter witnessed the bloody summer of 1973. The photograph captures a tense moment in which Cesar Chavez, hand on chin, and flanked by UFW supporters, is locked in a heated debate with a Coachella Valley grower. Chavez had asked the farm owner why he had picked the Teamsters, who are standing behind the owner, to represent the farm workers who picked his grapes. By accepting Teamster representation, Chavez argued, growers were trying to deny farm workers their democratic right vote for a union., 098-034
[Protester on street] - restricted
[Protester on street] - restricted
Protester walking down street with a sign reading in Spanish: "Farm workers want to stop being exploited. Vote Yes on Prop. 14.", 098-010
Lunchtime during picketing - restricted
Lunchtime during picketing - restricted
Picketing produced more than acrimony. Echavarria remembers lunchtime as a beautiful and blessed moment when local residents could show their support by preparing and donating food, and thus strengthening the bonds between local farm workers. From left to right: Lola Flores, Jesus Estorga, Maria Guzman, Leopoldo Rodrogues, and Fela Teniente., 098-031
 Laborer working with the short-handled hoe (el cortito). - restricted
Laborer working with the short-handled hoe (el cortito). - restricted
Constant bending over in the fields permanently injured the backs of many field workers. Working with the short-handled hoe, or el cortito, was considered one of the worst of agricultures labor-intensive jobs., 098-001
 Family of sharecroppers planting strawberries - restricted
Family of sharecroppers planting strawberries - restricted
A family of sharecroppers, including children, plant strawberries the old fashioned way-- with the short-handled hoe [el cortito]-- in Santa Maria Valley fields. The UFW and its supporters succeeded in banning the backbreaking tool in 1975., 098-004
UFW supporter with son - restricted
UFW supporter with son - restricted
A quiet moment in an escalating struggle. A UFW supporter takes time-out to snuggle up to his son. The eagle on the back of the boys shirt is the emblem of the UFW flag. The black eagle represents a re-birth and is borrowed from the Aztec myth., 098-019
 UFW supporters and organizers known as the Santa Maria Ten" - restricted
UFW supporters and organizers known as the Santa Maria Ten" - restricted
In March 1972, la causa came to Guadalupe. UFW supporters and organizers, otherwise known as the Santa Maria Ten, were charged with disrupting a public meeting in the towns grammar school. Witnesses testified that the 300 community members in attendance had in fact booed a member of the ultra-rightist John Birch Society incited by the Parent-Teachers Club to lecture against the UFW. A U.S. Commission on Civil Rights report concluded that the charges, most of which were dropped, illustrated a pattern of reprisals taken against Mexican-American UFW activists who spoke out against racist school officials. Starting from left to right in the first row, is Margarita Cabello, Juanita Estorga, Carmen Magana, Maria Manriques Cota Vaca, Jesus Ortiz. Starting from left to right in the second row, Angel Fierro, Sammy Gonzalez, Fermin Sepulveda, and Manuel Echavarria, the only one who served jail time., 098-013
 Migrant farm worker family eating lunch - restricted
Migrant farm worker family eating lunch - restricted
Supporters rolled in from unexpected quarters. Taking shelter from the sun, a family of migrant farm workers on their way to other crops, stop for lunch after a morning of picketing with the UFW., 098-032
 Girl helping her family plant strawberries, 1969 - restricted
Girl helping her family plant strawberries, 1969 - restricted
As a result of low wages, day care was not an option for most farm workers in the Santa Maria Valley. Children also worked to help supplement income for the family. The girl helps her family plant strawberries during May to August season in 1969. Unfortunately, the practice continues to this day., 098-002
 UFW organizers performing in celebration of the signing of the California                Agricultural Labor Relations Act, 1975 - restricted
UFW organizers performing in celebration of the signing of the California Agricultural Labor Relations Act, 1975 - restricted
Years of struggle are rewarded in 1975. Veteran UFW organizers Jessica Govea, far right, and Eugenio (Winnie) Arvallo, left, perform in the Guadalupe Recreation Center to celebrate Governor Jerry Browns signing of the California Agricultural Labor Relations Act into law. The act allows farm workers to vote and select the union of their choice, and UFW organizers to walk into the fields to talk to farm workers during specified break periods: a right enjoyed by industrial workers., 098-041

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